A great way to work on comprehension, order of events, and language skills is through story-telling.  A couple months ago, we shared a Sequencing Stick for the much loved story, A Very Hungry Caterpillar.  For this month's Bookspiration "Fairy Tale" Theme, we chose to make a story-telling bracelet to go along with The Three Little Pigs.

A great way to work on comprehension, order of events, and language skills is through story-telling.  Try this story-telling bracelet!

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As with many fairy tales, there are several versions.  We read The Three Little Pigs by Barry Moser , but some other versions to read are:



I first read the story to my 5 and 3 year old-- as they have not heard the story before!  For the second reading, I brought out our stash of beads and pipe cleaners.

To make your own story-telling bracelet you'll need:



I read the story a second time, this time pausing in several places so that we could recreate the story using beads.

We first picked three pink beads for the each of the little pigs.

As we read about the first little pig who made his house of straw, we threaded a pink bead onto the pipe cleaner followed by a bead that reminded us of straw: a yellow bead.  When the big bad wolf appeared, we threaded another bead onto our story-telling bracelet: a gray or black bead to represent the wolf.  We continued until the story was complete.

For the second pig, we threaded another pink bead onto our bracelet and added a brown bead to represent his house made of twigs.  When the wolf appeared, we again added a gray or black bead onto our bracelet.

For the third pig, we threaded our last pink bead onto our bracelet followed by a red bead to represent his house made of brick.  When the wolf appeared, we again added a gray or black bead to our bracelet.

However, since the third pig was quite wise and added a pot of boiling water to the fireplace awaiting the wolf, we finished off our story-telling bracelet by adding a blue bead.

The version of the Three Little Pigs that we read by Barry Moser actually involved a few more incidents where the wolf tried to outsmart the pig, so you could add a few more beads to represent that or simplify the story as we did above to recreate your bracelet.

Now, proudly showcase your Three Little Pigs Storytelling Bracelet and use it to help you re-tell the story!



More Fairy Tale Bookspiration!


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Set up a simple fine motor activity to work on letter recognition. This letter matching activity can be set up various ways depending on your child's skill level: alphabetical order, uppercase/ lowercase letter recognition, sequencing, etc!  With just a few minutes of prep you'll have a great activity focusing on the alphabet and fine motor skills!
Set up a simple fine motor activity to work on letter recognition. This letter matching activity can be set up various ways depending on your child's skill level: alphabetical order, uppercase/ lowercase letter recognition, sequencing, etc!


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What you need:
empty box
craft sticks
foam letters {ours supplied by CraftProjectIdeas}
knife {caution, adult only!!}
sharpie pen

Take a few minutest to prep this activity away from the kids as you'll be using a knife to puncture slits in the empty box. On one side of the box, puncture 26 holes-- large enough for your child to insert a craft stick.  Above each slit, write a letter of the alphabet.  Go in alphabetical order... or choose to write the letters in random order.

Fine Motor Alphabet Activity


Next, have your children help adhere the foam letter stickers to the top of each craft stick.  If you do not have foam letters, just write the letter on the craft stick with a marker.

I made up this fine motor alphabet activity to work on upper and lowercase letter recognition and matching for my 3 and 5 year old.  On the box above each slit, I wrote a lowercase letter and then had them match it with the uppercase letter on the craft stick.

Once the box and craft sticks are ready to go, have your child match the letter on the craft stick to the letter on the box by pushing the craft stick into the slit.

Continue until all the letters have been matched!  Such a great and simple fine motor activity for little hands!

Another fun way to work on these fine motor skills and ABC's is using LEGOS, too!  Or try ABC Basketball!

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99 fine motor ideas for ages 1 to 5
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My kiddos love playing games!  And why not, learn a new concept, too?  Have fun learning about Roman Numerals with this cute airplane themed Roman Numerals Memory Game.  Add it to your week rowing The Glorious Flight, when your math program introduces roman numerals, or just because!  

Have fun learning about Roman Numerals with this cute airplane themed Roman Numerals Memory Game
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For Big Brother's 4K and 5K year, we enjoyed learning with Five in a Row.  Fast forward and he's just shy of turning 9!! {sniff, sniff}, so we teamed up with our Early Elementary Blogging Friends to revisit The Glorious Flight for this week's Transportation Theme.

The Glorious Flight is a fictional story inspired by a true event.  The story documents Papa Bleriot's attempts at building a flying aircraft and being the first to fly over the English Channel.  It took Papa Bleriot six attempts to building a aircraft that would take flight; each airplane was numbered with a Roman Numeral: Bleriot I, Bleriot II, etc.  

Thus, this story was a great time to introduce Roman Numerals.  We've talked about Roman Numerals before during our detailed row of The Glorious Flight, and also just through being aware of text while reading.  However,.....
Games make learning/ reinforcing a concepts way more fun!!

To set up this Roman Numerals Matching Game, you'll need:


First print out your Roman Numerals Matching Game Cards.

Laminate them for durability.

Cut out each card and then cut each card in half again-- thus creating the matching pair.
Set up the game just like a regular game of memory by laying the cards face down in front of you.  Player 1 flips over two cards.  If they match, he/she keeps the cards, if not, simply turn over the cards and Player 2 takes a turn.  Continue playing until all the cards have been matched up.

Each card has an airplane in the middle, which allows for an element of self correction.  So for those that do not yet know Roman Numerals 1-10, just put the cards together to see the the airplane matches.  If it does, it's a match.  If not, try again!

If you love memory games, too-- you might like our SuperHero Contractions Memory Game!

Print your Roman Numerals Memory Game Here!

More Transportation Themed Activities for Early Elementary:


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Our latest I SPY Printable will make a great addition to our free Shapes Printable Pack.  Your child will love discriminating and finding various shapes in this I SPY: Shapes Printable.  It's a great way to talk about all the shapes your child may know, plus a few new ones.

Your child will love discriminating and finding various shapes in this I SPY: Shapes Printable.  It's a great way to talk about all the shapes your child may know, plus a few new ones.
I SPY Games are a great way to work on visual scanning and discrimination-- and well are just plain FUN, too!

Print out this I SPY: Shapes and talk about the colors and shapes you see.

Your child will search this one page printable for circles, stars, pentagons, squares, trapezoids, octagons, ovals, rectangles, rhombus, and triangles!  Your child can record how many of each shape he/she finds at the bottom of the printable.

I SPY Printable for Kids


I SPY: Shapes is a fun math-themed printable for preschoolers.  I worked on it with my 3 year old and instead of writing numbers, I had my son find the shapes while I counted them.  And as he found each shape, we put a small bead on top of it-- great for fine motor skills, too!

For more I SPY Challenges, you might like:

*for personal use only.
*do not alter, sell, copy, or distribute this printable in any way.
* Shape Friends Clipart licensed to 2 Super Teachers.



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Learning new concepts is always fun with a variety of different manipulatives--especially math!  Today we are joining our Learning with Manipulatives friends to share a fun math activity.  In this Making 10 Math Activity your child will work out various addition problems adding up to 10 using foam blocks.  Using manipulatives are great for hands-on learners!

Foam blocks are a great hands-on manipulative!  Love this simple way to work on math skills!

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We picked up our foam blocks for pretty cheap and have used them for all sorts of activities ranging from a Color Matching Velcro Tower to Word Family BINGO to this Making 10 Math Activity!

Addition Activity: Making 10


What you need:
Making 10 Worksheet {free printable available at worksheetfun.com}
Empty Egg Carton {cut the egg carton so that there are 10 spaces}
Two colors of  Foam Blocks
Pencil or Number Manipulatives

Tell your child you are going to work on adding numbers to make 10 using the foam blocks.  With the Making 10 worksheet handy, read the addition problem: "2+ __=10".

Model the problem by placing two of the same colored blocks into the egg carton.  Next ask your child "How many more do we need to make 10?"  

Your child can easily count the empty spaces in the egg carton to find the answer.

This Making 10 Math Activity is great for visual and tactile learners.  Have your child use the other color foam blocks to fill in the empty spaces.


Instead of having Little Sis write the numbers in the blank, I brought out some foam number manipulatives.  This allowed us to work on number recognition as well.

If your child is not ready for adding to make 10, try this fun math game with foam blocks or any type of manipulative you choose!  Or work on Number Bonds with Cars! {one of my son's favorite activities}

More ways to learn with foam blocks:



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